FOUNDER

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Donald Curtis was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Palmer Park, Maryland. He is a graduate of Prince George County Public Schools. Donald played college basketball for Chattanooga State Technical College in Southeast Tennessee. He holds a B.S. in Business Administration – Marketing from the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga, a M.S. in Strategic Communication from American University in D.C. and completed his Executive Education at University of Maryland – College Park.  

He has been supporting youth development programs since 2003. Since then he has worked in a variety of youth systems; supporting youth in mental health care institutions, foster care, juvenile detention centers. He has taught and coached student-athletes in the Prince George County, Maryland and Washington, D.C. public school systems.

Prior to founding SOUL, Donald served on the advisory councils for several DC based youth initiatives programs. He worked in the Center for Community Engagement and Service at American University, where he was the faculty/staff adviser for several affinity groups. This includes the university’s Black Student Alliance, Caribbean Student Club, Community Service Coalition, Concerned Back Men, Dominican Student Association, Lion’s Club, and Students Fighting Homelessness & Hunger. Here he also coordinated a network of Black faculty and staff to support minority students with collegiate transitions and academic development.

Donald has received numerous awards for his work with low-income and marginalized groups. The list includes the Washington Mystics & Capital One – Community Champion Award, NBA Cares and Verizon Community Assist Award, American University Staff Performance Award – Diversity, Black  Men Can – Building Better Brother Award, ABC News Channel 7 – Harris’ Heroes, Washington Wizards Youth Coach of the Month, ABC News Channel 7 Coach of the Week. Donald has also served as a Honorary Guest Coach American University Women’s Basketball team, and been highlight in the Washington Post and American Magazine on multiple occasions.